Dedicated to the French Revolution for inspirational purposes!

  1. vivelareine:


He wept for sorrow over us, and not from fear of death.

—the narrative of Marie Thérèse Charlotte, daughter of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette

    vivelareine:

    He wept for sorrow over us, and not from fear of death.

    —the narrative of Marie Thérèse Charlotte, daughter of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette

  2. georgianaspencer:

    Today in History:  January 21st1793 - Execution of Louis XVI

    Louis XVI, King of France was executioned by guillotine at the Place de la Révolution (nowadays Place de la Concorde) in Paris on January 21st, 1793. He had been convicted of high treason by the National Convention and was the first victim of the “Reign of Terror”. His wife, Marie Antoinette, would be executed on October 16th of the same year. An eyewitness, Father Edgeworth, describes the King’s last moments:

    "The path leading to the scaffold was extremely rough and difficult to pass; the King was obliged to lean on my arm, and from the slowness with which he proceeded, I feared for a moment that his courage might fail; but what was my astonishment, when arrived at the last step, I felt that he suddenly let go my arm, and I saw him cross with a firm foot the breadth of the whole scaffold; silence, by his look alone, fifteen or twenty drums that were placed opposite to me; and in a voice so loud, that it must have been heard at the Pont Tournant, I heard him pronounce distinctly these memorable words: “I die innocent of all the crimes laid to my charge; I Pardon those who have occasioned my death; and I pray to God that the blood you are going to shed may never be visited on France”.”
  3. deviliciousdorian:

    I started making them and I couldn’t stop.

    (Source: robespierristwildean)

  4. vivelareine:

The King on the Balcony of Versailles, overlooking the Marble Courtyard. “My children, I will go to Paris but on the condition that it will be with my wife and children.”
image: Bibliothèque nationale de France, département Estampes et photographie

    vivelareine:

    The King on the Balcony of Versailles, overlooking the Marble Courtyard. “My children, I will go to Paris but on the condition that it will be with my wife and children.”

    image: Bibliothèque nationale de France, département Estampes et photographie

  5. From this first intervention by a female crowd in the Revolution [the march on Versailles], we can identify characteristics that became increasingly distinct during the following years. Women took the initiative and were soon followed by men organized in armed groups. In a tense political situation, the need for bread mobilized women and created a female mob but did not blind them: “They asked for bread, yet not at the price of liberty,” wrote the author of Les Revolutions de Paris, who described how the women overwhelmed a royalist with abuse when he “perfidiously” assured them that they would not lack bread if the king recovered all of his authority. We cannot speak of a clearly developed female conscious in 1789, but already the question of subsistence is inseparable from political concerns. 

    Dominique Godineau, The Women of Paris and their French Revolution

    (Source: bunniesandbeheadings)

  6. vivelareine:


… Victorine de Chastenay observed a jubilant crowd accompanying the royal family on its journey back to Paris:
That odious multitude finally started off to Paris. Some of them carried several loaves of bread stuck on their spears or bayonets; but what was most unbelievable is that the heads of the Queen’s guards proceeded them.
Whereas later republican historians, like the great Jules Michelet, described this event as a “festival” with loaves of bread and poplar branches held high by exultant women and children, Mme de Chastenay renders the vision of a terrified bystander, whose eye saw only the blood-stained heads of the guards[.]

—Blood Sisters: The French Revolution in Women’s Memory by Marilyn Yalom

    vivelareine:

    … Victorine de Chastenay observed a jubilant crowd accompanying the royal family on its journey back to Paris:

    That odious multitude finally started off to Paris. Some of them carried several loaves of bread stuck on their spears or bayonets; but what was most unbelievable is that the heads of the Queen’s guards proceeded them.

    Whereas later republican historians, like the great Jules Michelet, described this event as a “festival” with loaves of bread and poplar branches held high by exultant women and children, Mme de Chastenay renders the vision of a terrified bystander, whose eye saw only the blood-stained heads of the guards[.]

    Blood Sisters: The French Revolution in Women’s Memory by Marilyn Yalom

  7. fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

October 5, 1789: Enraged by the high price and scarcity of bread, thousands of Parisian women and their allies marched on the royal palace at Versailles.

    fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

    October 5, 1789: Enraged by the high price and scarcity of bread, thousands of Parisian women and their allies marched on the royal palace at Versailles.

  8. tiny-librarian:

Detail of an illustration entitled “The entry of the King and the Royal Family into Paris on October 6th, 1789”.
Source

    tiny-librarian:

    Detail of an illustration entitled “The entry of the King and the Royal Family into Paris on October 6th, 1789”.

    Source

  9. tiny-librarian:

    Yes my dear brother, our situation is dreadful……I am in constant terror. After having undergone the horrors of the 5th and 6th October, anything may be expected. Assassination is at our doors. I can not show myself at a window, even with my children, without being insulted by a drunken mob, to whom I have done no harm, and amongst whom there are doubtless unfortunates whom I have myself relieved. I am prepared for any event, and I can now, unmoved, hear them calling for my head……forgive me, I entreat you, if I still refuse your advice to leave: remember that I am not my own mistress; my duty is to remain where Providence has placed me, and to oppose my own body, if need be, to the dangers of the assassins who would attack the King. I should be unworthy of our mother, who is as dear to you as to myself, if danger could induce me to fly far away from the King and from my children.

    Marie Antoinette to her brother, Leopold II, December 27th, 1790

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